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Tribal Energy and Environmental Information Clearinghouse
Tribal Energy and Environmental Information Clearinghouse: Environmental resources for tribal energy development
Energy Resources Assessments & Monitoring Laws & Regulations
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Laws and Regulations: Health & Safety

Federal statutes (laws), Executive Orders, and regulations concerned with health and safety.

Follow the links below to learn about Federal statutes (laws), Executive Orders, and regulations that may apply to specific activities associated with energy development that may impact health and safety.

Executive Order 13045 was issued by President Clinton on April 21, 1997, directing federal agencies to make it a high priority to identify and assess environmental health risks and safety risks that may disproportionately affect children and ensure that their policies, programs, activities, and standards address disproportionate risks to children that result from environmental health risks or safety risks.

Legislation, also known as the Mine Act (30 USC 801 et seq.), requiring the U.S. Department of Labor, Mine Safety and Health Administration (MSHA) to inspect surface mines and underground mines; investigate mine accidents, complaints, and violations; develop safety and health standards; assess and collect monetary penalties for violation of these standards; expand educational programs related to mine safety; and approve mining, education, and training plans. Sec. 316 of the Mine Act (30 USC 876) was amended in 2006 by the Mine Improvement and New Emergency Response Act, also known as the MINER Act, to improve safety and health in mines through improved accident preparedness. The full suite of regulations promulgated by MSHA is available at 30 CFR 1-199.

Legislation governing occupational health and safety in both the private sector and federal government. The main goal of the OSH Act (29 USC 651 et seq.) is to ensure that employers provide employees with an environment free from recognized hazards, such as exposure to toxic chemicals, excessive noise levels, mechanical dangers, heat or cold stress, or unsanitary conditions. The full suite of regulations promulgated by the U.S. Occupational Health and Safety Administration (OSHA) is available at 29 CFR 1-3058.